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What’s On at the Centre for Creative Health

Community Gallery - ‘Hindsight’ - Kirsty Martinsen | 24 November – 24 January 2019

Hindsight is the ability to understand and realise something about an event after it has happened, although you did not understand or realise it at the time. – Collins English Dictionary

Hindsight is delicious and extremely valuable. These drawings, Self Portrait 2008-18, These Boots (are made for walking) 2001-2018 and Make Me 2002-18 show a physical and emotional self that is gone. Collaged with the tyre tracks and abstract elements of today, they become strong works that explore the richness of the whole, the total of all experiences.

In Self Portrait 2008-18 a figure stands between a woman in a wheelchair and a wheelchair tyre print. It incorporates elements of me from 2008 and before; it was my practice to paint a quick one hour self-portrait when I arrived in the studio every morning and the standing figure is one of those, a self-portrait in a wheelchair from 2015 drawn in charcoal on recycled watercolours and drawings, and the marks from my wheelchair tyres of 2018.

As the world reeled with the aftershock of 9/11 I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The work Make Me 2002-18, an abstract painting from 2002, I did with a broom and walked all over when my head was full of the war within my own body. It is attached to a drawing of tyre tracks from my wheelchair, boot prints and tyre tread, joining in one evocation gesture. The past informing the present in a weirdly prophetic way. I can no longer make foot or boot prints and I use mops and brooms to paint with now, although with nowhere near the physical strength I did in 2002.

These Boots (are made for walking) 2001-2018 incorporates drawings of 9/11 and tyre tracks, with a meditative self-portrait watercolour from December 2002. Knee high boots standing like twin towers amid confusion and chaos.

Hindsight has a way of simplifying what was in fact very complex. It’s very difficult when you’re at the beginning of a journey such as MS to know how to navigate it. And very easy with the benefit of hindsight to look back in judgement. Would I do things differently if I had my time again? No. And these drawings are testament to this.

Make Me 2002-18 by Kirsty Martinsen

Make Me 2002-18 by Kirsty Martinsen

Self Portrait 2008-18 by Kirsty Martinsen

Self Portrait 2008-18 by Kirsty Martinsen

These Boots (are made for walking) 2001-18 by Kirsty Martinsen

These Boots (are made for walking) 2001-18 by Kirsty Martinsen

Tom Keukenmeester, born in Adelaide, is a contemporary Australian Artist. His work has been shown across Australia in galleries and exhibitions.

Tom Keukenmeester returned to Australia in 2013 to begin working as a professional artist after four years of traveling for work and study. Having always drawn and painted Tom chose to return to Australia to take his artistic practice more seriously. During his time living in London, New York and Montreal, Tom continuously developed his self-taught artistic skills, drawing and painting.

Tom completed his undergraduate studies at the University of South Australia in 2013 after returning from studying at Concordia University, Montreal. He also studied Art History at the University of Adelaide and has studied Drawing at Adelaide Central School of Art.

Recently Tom’s work has been selected as a finalist in the 2017 Royal South Australian Society of Arts Biennial Portrait Prize (Winning the RSASA award), 2017 Cliftons Art Prize, 2016 Fleurieu Art Prize, 2016 Loreto Star Portrait, 2015 Lethbridge Art Prize, the 2014 Cossack Art Prize, and the 2014 Royal South Australian Society of Arts Youth Art Prize.

The concept behind the exhibition will be a glimpse into what Adelaide might look like in 50 years’ time, echoing the idea that the new Royal Adelaide Hospital is a future icon of the city.

“My work is mostly figurative in nature and often incorporates notions of identity and consumer culture. Here I have used still life, genre paintings and ceramic plates as a means to explore these ideas in order to tell a story.

“I am pleased to have the opportunity to create a body of work with a South Australian centric narrative and to be able to exhibit publically in the new RAH.

“When first presented with the opportunity to show work in this space, I was excited by the opportunity. Hospitals are places of healing and my aim

Frog Cake by Tom Keukenmeester

Frog Cake by Tom Keukenmeester

Pirate still life by Tom Keukenmeester

Pirate still life by Tom Keukenmeester

I was born in 1964 in Adelaide. My parents were both German immigrants. Mum was a very talented artist and Dad a painter and decorator. I was blessed with the creative gene.

I am self-taught, with knowledge only gained at school, ceramic classes and a silk painting class I took with my mother. She was my inspiration and we had a lot of fun creating and entering Rotary Art Exhibitions together. After she passed away, although I had stopped doing art for a while, I never lost my passion for creativity.

In 2009 my sister (also a talented artist) and I decided to get together and do some art. I have not looked back since, even collecting a few merit badges along the way. I love working on canvas, board (outdoor art) and other paintable objects, and I have maintained a similar style to when I did my silk painting. I like to experiment with different textures and mediums, and rarely plan my entire piece as I like my paintings to evolve as I’m working on them.

I live on the Fleurieu Peninsula, which to me is the most wonderful place in the world. I am fortunate to have my art on display in a variety of places in the region and elsewhere. I am also one of the artists featured in a book called Amazing Australian Artists produced by Art Me Gallery. I’m a firm believer in spreading one’s art around, even in the most unlikely of places, because even if only one person stops to look, you have achieved something. Art should always be shared.

You can find me on Facebook under Lynette Kring Art.

Emus by Lynette Kring

Emus by Lynette Kring

Intoxicating Beauty by Lynette Kring

Intoxicating Beauty by Lynette Kring

Dana Kinter is an artist living and making in the Fleurieu Peninsula. Drawing from the natural environment surrounding her home and an Encyclopedia of Australian Birds handed down by her Grandmother, Dana has created a signature style that embraces Australia’s native flora and fauna.

Inspired by early 20th century Australian and Indigenous art, religious iconography, Japanese culture, and everything Art Nouveau, Dana employs a subdued colour palette with emphasis on the natural characteristics of her materials. Dana uses pencil acrylic on timber in her paintings, preferring to work on a series of woodblocks at once, aided by foraged treasures and views from her backyard studio. Recently, Dana has returned to working with ceramics, carving and painting feathered friends with a distinctive focus on colour, line and form, onto hand built homewares that serve as a base for her artworks.

Greeting the Morning is a collection of artworks that welcomes the viewer to come and be still for a moment, to be embraced by the beauty of the natural world and just listen to the birds. A place that is quiet, healing and uplifting. I am grateful to the RAH for this opportunity and I hope my artworks bring joy and inspiration.

Greeting the morning by Dana Kinter

Greeting the morning by Dana Kinter

My beautiful world by Dana Kinter

My beautiful world by Dana Kinter

My current series “Where the Wild Things Grow” is a combination of flowers and animal portraits.

My aim is to create art that has a strong presence that embodies the subject in a way that allows you to experience the art as an interactive gathering “enjoying the moment”.

I am inspired by nature and wildlife photographs that I see, which speak to me and evoke a feeling of connection and raw emotion.

My new love of painting is for flowers and animals, stretching myself to harness the emotional serenity, softness, beauty and mystery of the Wild Thing. I strive to create an intimate fleeting moment, discovering and connecting with the images.

I love the challenge of painting realistically because I am excited to see the finished results. The images develop on the canvas as I work. My artwork contains many layers of acrylic brush stokes, unrelenting until I achieve the desired result on the canvas.

Wild things are a culmination of beauty that we cannot get close to, that foster wonder and amazement.

Art has been proven to improve the health and mindset in patients. It is my opinion that art can be a form of meditation as you can get lost for hours thinking of nothing else, allowing your brain to focus solely on one thing.

Chimpanzee by Katrina Elden

Chimpanzee by Katrina Elden

Laze by Katrina Elden

Laze by Katrina Elden

Artworks are for sale.

Please contact Fiona Borthwick for more information.

08 7074 1439
fborthwick@creativehealth.org.au